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Canoeing 101

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Regardless of whether you invested in a top end or budget-priced PFD, it behooves you to treat it right so it can do its job on your behalf. Always hang your PFD up to dry after use . Leaving it to molder in your car trunk will encourage mildew and...

Beam (Width) Measured at the widest point of the canoe and largely impacts stability and speed. The most common reference is width at the gunwales but an often more telling dimension is width at the waterline, as this will determine the amount of...

Symmetry refers to the shape of the canoe viewed from overhead. Canoes can be symmetrical or asymmetrical. Asymmetrical canoes can be fish-form with widest point ahead of center or swede-form with widest point behind center. Symmetrical Pros...

Keel Line A canoe's keel line is the profile of the hull bottom running from stem to stem, best seen by standing back and viewing the canoe from the side. The keel line can range from straight or level to highly arched or rockered (think of the...

Hull (Cross Section) To visualize this aspect of canoe design, think about bisecting the canoe from side to side. The hull can impact canoe performance in a number of ways, from stability to maneuverability to speed. Canoes usually feature one of...

Click on the thumbnail below for a list of Appalachian Mountain Club's top Class I - II rapids in America.

As a lighter weight option on our Royalex hulls, Mad River Canoe has long offered black powder-coated aluminum gunwales. A low-maintenance alternative to the traditional ash, aluminum gunwales save approximately 3-5 pounds per canoe. It must be...

As a lightweight option on our composite hulls, Mad River Canoe offers black powder-coated aluminum gunwales. A low-maintenance alternative to the traditional ash, aluminum gunwales that save approximately 3-5 pounds per canoe. When ordering...

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